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When Will You Get Your 2021 Tax Refund? How to Prepare and When to Expect That Check

One of the top tax refund questions many filers ask is, “When will I get my tax refund?” Unfortunately, it’s impossible to know the exact date of when you’ll receive your tax refund — the answer varies and it truly depends on when and how you filed your tax return.

However, you can estimate when you’ll receive your funds. According to the IRS, most refunds are sent less than 21 days after filing. So generally, you can expect to get your tax refund about three weeks after you file your tax return.

2021 IRS Tax Refund Calendar: When Will I Get My Tax Refund?

Return Filed

Direct Deposit Sent

Paper Check Mailed

February 14–20

March 5

March 12

February 21–27

March 12

March 19

February 28–March 6

March 19

April 26

March 7–13

March 26

April 2

March 14–20

April 2

April 9

March 21–27

April 9

April 16

March 28–April 3

April 16

 

April 23

April 4–10

April 23

April 30

April 11–17

April 30

May 7

April 18–24

May 7

May 14

April 25–May 1

May 14

May 21

May 2–8

May 21

May 28

May 9–15

May 28

June 4

May 16–22

June 4

June 11

May 23–29

June 11

June 18

May 30–June 5

June 18

June 25

June 6–12

June 25

July 2

June 13–19

July 2

July 9

June 20–26

July 9

July 16

June 27–July 3

July 16

July 23

July 4–July 10

July 23

Juyl 30

July 11–17

July 30

August 6

July 18–24

August 6

August 13

July 25–31

August 13

August 20

 

It’s no secret that 2020 has been a tumultuous year. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many Americans found themselves out of work — at least temporarily — and received unemployment benefits. Others may have experienced employment changes, like working from home or taking on multiple jobs. All of these factors will have even more of an impact come time to file income taxes on tax day, April 15, 2021.

“For many, the 2020 tax season will likely look different,” says Mark Steber, Chief Tax Information Officer at Jackson Hewitt Tax Services. “The pandemic brought unexpected, overwhelming changes.”

To help you prepare and get the maximum tax refund you deserve, Steber offers the following tax tips.

1. Understand how unemployment benefits work

If you received unemployment benefits this year, it may have been for the first time. Make sure you’re aware of how they affect your taxes.

Unemployment benefits are taxable and must be reported to the IRS on your tax return. Taxable benefits also include any special compensation authorized under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act earlier this year. That means if you did not withhold enough taxes from your unemployment benefits, you could see a big tax bill or a much smaller tax refund than you normally receive.

Unemployment benefits can affect tax credits. Unemployment is considered unearned income, so it won’t count toward certain credits. For example, you must have earned income to qualify for the Child Tax Credit or the Earned Income Tax Credit. Additionally, your adjusted gross income must be below certain levels to get certain credits.

Paycheck Checkup: you can use the IRS Tax Withholding Estimator to help make sure your withholding is right for 2021.

2. Set money aside to cover unexpected taxes

If you received unemployment benefits and did not withhold any federal or state income tax, you’ll need to pay tax on that money. To prepare, consider setting money aside now to cover those taxes on your 2020 return and brace yourself for a much smaller refund or no refund at all this tax season.

3. Take advantage of possible deductions

Every taxpayer will get a charitable donation deduction for 2020. Make a list of any IRS-approved donations you made this year and locate any receipts. Whether itemizing or taking the standard deduction, under the CARES Act, all taxpayers are eligible to deduct up to $300 worth of monetary donations to qualified organizations.

And while many Americans have been working at home for months, a home office deduction is not guaranteed. The home office deduction is only available to those who are self-employed.

4. Consider major life changes

Life goes on, even during a pandemic, and life changes can bring sizeable tax implications. Some changes that cause the biggest impact include getting married or divorced, having a baby or adopting a child, buying or selling property, retiring, or starting a business. If you experienced any of these events in 2020, know that your return will look different.

5. Keep track of important documents

Even if your taxes won’t be affected by unemployment, make sure you gather all your documents, such as W-2 forms and 1099s for interest dividends and even retirement distributions. Remember to include the Notice 1444 you received with your stimulus check for your 2020 tax records. Collect your charitable contribution totals, mortgage interest, property taxes you’ve paid, and any additional state and local income taxes paid for the year. If you were furloughed and able to pick up a temporary job, gather your W-2s for each job you worked. If you worked a side gig, make sure to keep a record of your income, the miles you drove, and any additional expenses. And if you’re not filing single, be on the lookout for family members that may have been impacted to make your tax return more complicated.

How can you check on your refund?

Using a mobile device, download the IRS2Go app to check your refund status. You can also visit the IRS Where's My Refund web page. When you call, you will need your social security number or ITIN, your filing status, and your exact refund amount.

 

 

Sources (BPT), IRS