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The Most Popular Toys of the Last 120 Years That You Can Still Buy Today


It's almost that time of the year again, buying toys for Christmas. Times change and so does taste. Did you know you can still buy these toys today? Your child just might not want to find one of them under the tree.

1890s:  Crayola crayons: 

Believe it or not, Crayola has been around since 1885. And they haven’t changed much – they’re still colorful and fun.

1910s:  Raggedy Ann dolls: 

Raggedy Ann began as a book character, and the doll began to be produced in 1915. Her popularity inspired the conception of Ann’s brother, Raggedy Andy, in 1920.

1920s:  Radio Flyer wagons: 

While they also produce scooters, tricycles, and bicycles, the classic steel-and-wood wagon is what the toy company Radio Flyer is best known for.

1930s:  Monopoly: 

Designed in 1904 as “The Landlord’s Game”, it became very popular as “Monopoly” during The Great Depression.

1940s:  Slinky: 

A mesmerizing toy with a simple design, based on the spring. 

1950s:  Mr. Potato Head: 

The model of a potato that can be decorated with parts that attach to the main body. Originally, a real potato was used. 

1960s:  Easy-Bake ovens:

Introduced 1963, the original toy used an ordinary light bulb as a heat source. Current versions use a real heating element.

1970s:  Star Wars action figures: 

We’re pretty sure you could still find some Star Wars merchandise out there if you look hard enough!

1980s:  Rubik’s Cube: 

The “Magic Cube” was designed in 1974, but became the biggest toy in the world in the 80s.

1990s:  Playstation:

Kids couldn’t get enough of it in the ’90s, and they still can’t today.

2000s:  Razor Scooters: 

The compact kick scooter enables riders to do tricks, spins, and flips, or just zoom around the neighborhood. 

2010s:  iPad: 

It boomed in popularity among adults, teens, and tweens alike. It does everything your smartphone can do — but with a bigger screen. 

2020s:  So far, it’s Baby Yoda.

We can do better than THAT, can’t we?

It's not too early to think about when to ship Christmas gifts.

The nation's three largest carriers – FedEx, UPS and the United States Postal Service – have released their 2021 holiday shipping deadlines, which are the recommended last day to ship gifts. 

UPS deadlines for Christmas Eve delivery

The following are the recommended last days for shipping gifts domestically for Dec. 24 delivery:

  • Ground: Check the UPS website for a quote.
  • 3-Day Select: Dec. 21
  • 2nd Day Air: Dec. 22
  • Next Day Air: Dec. 23

Note: UPS says its service guarantee is suspended on most packages but that starting Oct. 18 and until further notice, it is has made some "operational adjustments," which includes extending delivery commitment times for UPS Next Day Air from 10:30 a.m. to noon.

FedEx shipping deadlines for holiday packages

The following are the last days to ship gifts within the U.S.:

  • FedEx Home Delivery, FedEx Ground: Dec. 15
  • FedEx Express Saver, FedEx 3Day Freight: Dec. 21
  • FedEx 2Day: Dec. 22
  • FedEx 1Day Freight, FedEx Extra Hours: Dec. 23
  • FedEx SameDay: Dec. 24
  • USPS Christmas deadlines

    Here are the United States Postal Service's recommended “send-by dates for expected delivery” before Dec. 25 in the 48 contiguous states:

  • Retail Ground: Dec. 15

  • First-Class Mail: Dec. 17
  • Note: Ground shipping deadline to Alaska is Dec. 2, First-Class and Priority deadline is Dec. 18, and Priority Mail Express is Dec. 21. For Hawaii, Dec. 17 is the deadline for First-Class and Priority Mail, and Dec. 21 is the deadline for Priority Mail Express.